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Which is the Modern Way of Cyber Security? Is it Zero Trust?

Caroline Moran

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“Do not trust with blind eyes, verify everything and then believe.” Is the same thing applies to security strategy? Yes, of course. The traditional idea of enterprise security has become obsolete in a world where unauthentic access can be achieved through many devices and applications, either from inside the network or outside of it. 

In a modern security scenario, where different device and external data sources from the Internet are all factors, strategies related to security should be built around a zero trust mechanism- which means, one that believes nothing outside or inside an organization. With this approach, the network and the unwanted threats that will come are considered in sync. Today’s security should not be viewed as one big cover protecting the entire organization.

Zero trust architecture makes sure that data and access across the network are safe and based on criteria like user identity and location. It monitors and logs all traffic understand and examine network patterns, and add authentication procedure into the security mix, all with the purpose of seeing each user and device connected to the network anytime. 

Many establishments think that zero trust is the optimal way to approach safety in an unbounded business environment. In a recently conducted survey by Forbes Insights of more than 1000 security professionals and executives, 66% of them say that they have a policy of zero trust for application, devices, and access. 

Security Within: Securing the Inside of the Organization

Threats inside the organizations are a major cause of violations and a worry among security teams, in large part since they emerge internally in a number of ways- from devices and applications- and are difficult to find quickly.

Many transgressions originate from employees within the organization. The mistakenly published critical information and insider attacks have the biggest impact than attacks by outsiders like hackers. In the end, this is due to a failure to oversee the digital identities and conduct of individuals like employees, partners and bots or applications. And they are not mandatorily harmful in intent; they can be the result of careless and badly trained personnel. 

The difficulty comes down to this: providing accessibility of data and applications to the intended users in such a way that is fast, efficient and secure. It’s a fight over access and control. Simply trusting the wide area of the enterprise’s internal environment won’t suffice because the field is constantly changing as an employee goes to new roles and needs different access right. The network keeps growing bigger- and so does the possibility of an attack.

What companies require is the ability to validate and permit users, keep track of policies and rights in place, and recognize any abnormal insider activity. It is important to make participant aware of best security execution. The idea here is not to disbelieve your employees but to understand that they are a potential source of penetration.

Zero Trust: Empowering Business

Successful cybersecurity approach minimizes the complication of the IT environment to something very simple. 

The technologies and approaches behind zero trust:

  1. Micro-segmentation: In this process, security perimeters are placed into small and isolated areas to maintain independent access for a different division of the network. With this, files in a network can be kept in a separate and protected zone. A user or programs that have access to one of those zones won’t get access to the other zones without individual authorization. This bounds security to personal workload.
  2. Application Behavior and Visibility: One of the advantages of micro-segmentation is the granting of application security that consists of built-in policies that dictate permitted behavior and protection for each build. Visibility also needs to be taken into consideration so that unwanted activity can be detected and appropriate action can be taken quickly.
  3. Multi-Factor Authentication: It adds more features to the verification puzzle that harmful actors must resolve. The age of the password is a very old concept now. The use of two-factor authentication is being used widely now by consumers and partners. Another type of authentications like biometrics is becoming popular.
  4. Least Privilege: It provides only as much access as an end user requires for a particular task. It’s an important part of zero trust identity and access management.

Security personnel is being advised to be more strategic and drive revenue through technologies as their business grows. At the same time, cybersecurity is a difficult problem to overcome from both the end user side and in the data center since the attack surface is very wide. 

Caroline Moran is a renowned author and a financial expert at Virgin Bucks , an online lender. In this blog, she explains how zero trust approach minimizes time spent facing false positives and increases effectiveness, both among security personnel and a group of workers accessing the network.

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